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The FREE Complete Bay Area Auto Enthusiast Guide
JEEP GLADIATOR RETURNS 30 YEARS LATER!

The Jeep Gladiator is back! Resembling the Wagoneer, Gladiator debuted in 1963 in either 120-inch or 126-inch wheelbase and featured a Dana 20 transfer case and Dana 44s front and rear. The Gladiator name was dropped in 1972.
Off-road capability is courtesy of the Command-Trac and on Rubicon models Rock-Trac 4x4 systems, third-generation Dana 44 axles, Tru-Lock electric front- and rear-axle lockers, Trac-Lok limited-slip differential, segment-exclusive sway-bar disconnect and 33-inch off-road tires.
 
Advanced fuel-efficient powertrains
The all-new Jeep Gladiator will offer the proven 3.6-litre Pentastar V-6 engine at launch with a 3.0-litre EcoDiesel V-6 engine being offered in 2020. A six-speed manual transmission is standard on all Gladiator models equipped with the 3.6-litre Pentastar V-6, and an eight-speed automatic transmission is optional.
 
Midsize truck without compromise
The Gladiator delivers off-road capability courtesy of two advanced 4x4 systems. The Command-Trac 4x4 system, standard on Sport and Overland, features a two-speed transfer case with a 2.72:1 low-range gear ratio, and heavy-duty third-generation Dana 44 front and rear axles with a 3.73 rear axle ratio.
On Gladiator Rubicon, a Rock-Trac 4x4 system features heavy-duty third-generation Dana 44 front and rear axles with a “4LO” ratio of 4:1. A 4.10 front and rear axle ratio is standard as are Tru-Lok locking differentials.
Gladiator Rubicon models offer improved articulation and total suspension travel with help from a segment-exclusive electronic sway-bar disconnect. With the standard six-speed manual transmission, Gladiator Rubicon has a crawl ratio of 84.2:1, and 77.2:1 on Rubicon models equipped with the optional eight-speed auto, both of which makes scaling any obstacle on the trail easy. And tow capacity is 7,650 pounds.
 
More than 80 available advanced safety features
It offers more than 80 available active and passive safety and security features. Available features include blind-spot monitoring and rear cross path detection and forward-facing off-road camera, standard ParkView rear backup camera with dynamic grid lines, adaptive cruise control, and electronic stability control with electronic roll mitigation.

Rich heritage of tough, dependable Jeep trucks
The Gladiator is the latest iteration in a long line of Jeep trucks that began back in 1947 when Willys Overland introduced a one-ton truck with four-wheel drive based on the CJ-2A. With more than 40 years of rich heritage to draw from, Gladiator is the latest in a long line of Jeep trucks that includes: 
 
Jeep Pickup: 1947-1965
A 118-inch wheelbase pickup that realized few product changes. It was Willys-Overlands first attempt to diversify the Jeep brand from the CJ.

Jeep FC-150/170 Pickup: 1957-1965
These Forward-Control series Jeep vehicles were essentially work trucks – with an 81-inch wheelbase for the FC-150 and 103.5 inches for the FC-170. They received few changes during their lifecycle, though some 1959 and 1960 models featured full-floating front and rear axles, and some FC-170 models included dual rear wheels and a four-speed manual transmission.

Jeep CJ-8 Scrambler: 1981-1985
Introduced in 1981, the Scrambler was a Jeep similar to the CJ-7, but with a longer wheelbase. Known internationally as the CJ-8, it was available in either hard- or soft-top versions. Less than 30,000 Scramblers were built, and are extremely popular among collectors today.

Jeep Comanche (MJ): 1986-1992
Based on the Cherokee platform and similarly equipped, the pickup received a six-foot bed in 1987. Later models offered Selec-Trac or Command-Trac four-wheel drive.
Available in Sport, Sport S, Overland and Rubicon trims, and built in Toledo, Ohio, the Jeep Gladiator arrives in showrooms in the second quarter of 2019.

For more information, visit https://www.jeep.com/gladiator.html